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Membranes and Viruses in Immunopathology.

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Published by Academic Press in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Immunopathology -- Congresses,
  • Membranes (Biology) -- Congresses,
  • Viruses -- Congresses

Book details:

Edition Notes

StatementEdited by Stacey B. Day [and] Robert A. Good.
ContributionsDay, Stacey B., ed., Good, Robert A., 1922- ed., Bell Museum of Pathology.
Classifications
LC ClassificationsRC585 .M39 1972
The Physical Object
Paginationxvii, 604 p.
Number of Pages604
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL5287945M
LC Control Number72007346

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  Buy Membranes and Viruses in Immunopathology: Read Kindle Store Reviews - Membranes and Viruses in Immunopathology - Kindle edition by Day, Stacey B., Good, Robert A.. Professional & Technical Kindle eBooks @   Membranes and Viruses in Immunopathology covers the proceedings of the symposium by the same title, held at the University of Minnesota Medical School, sponsored by the Bell Museum of Pathology. This book is composed of 40 chapters that highlight the significant advances in fundamental experiments of membrane structure chemistry.   Membranes and Viruses in Immunopathology covers the proceedings of the symposium by the same title, held at the University of Minnesota Medical School, sponsored by the Bell Museum of Pathology. This book is composed of 40 chapters that highlight the significant advances in fundamental experiments of membrane structure : Elsevier Science. Conference on Membranes, Viruses, and Immune Mechanisms in Experimental and Clinical Diseases ( University of Minnesota). Membranes and viruses in immunopathology. New York, Academic Press, (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication: Document Type: Book: All Authors / Contributors: Stacey B Day; Robert A Good; Bell.

Conference on Membranes, Viruses, and Immune Mechanisms in Experimental and Clinical Diseases ( University of Minnesota). Membranes and viruses in immunopathology. New York, Academic Press, (DLC) (OCoLC) Material Type: Conference publication, Document, Internet resource: Document Type: Internet Resource, Computer File. Membranes and Viruses in Immunopathology by Day, Stacey B.; Good, Robert A. and Publisher Academic Press. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: , , The print version of this textbook is ISBN: , Viral Immunology and Immunopathology. Book • Many viruses have envelopes derived from host cell membranes, and all viruses are intimately related to host cell membranes during adsorption, penetration, and replication. Virus infections can lead to profound changes on the cell membrane as well as the basic physiology and behavior of. Purchase Viral Immunology and Immunopathology - 1st Edition. Print Book & E-Book. ISBN ,

Respiratory viruses infect the human upper respiratory tract, mostly causing mild diseases. However, in vulnerable populations, such as newborns, infants, the elderly and immune-compromised individuals, these opportunistic pathogens can also affect the lower respiratory tract, causing a more severe disease (e.g., pneumonia). Respiratory viruses can also exacerbate asthma and lead to various. Membranes and Viruses in Immunopathology covers the proceedings of the symposium by the same title, held at the University of Minnesota Medical School, sponsored by the Bell Museum of Pathology. This book is composed of 40 chapters that highlight. membranes, which are not all chemically identical. Complexes of antibody and hepatitis (B, C) virus proteins tend to get stuck in the basement membranes of medium arteries, causing the variant condition polyarteritis nodosa (of which, however, most cases are idiopathic, that is, the cause is unknown.) ANTIGENS OFTEN ARE EXOGENOUS. Enveloped viruses have membranes surrounding capsids. Animal viruses, such as HIV, are frequently enveloped. Head and tail viruses infect bacteria. They have a head that is similar to icosahedral viruses and a tail shape like filamentous viruses. Many viruses use some sort of glycoprotein to attach to their host cells via molecules on the cell.